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Core Team Profiles - Janus Boye

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Janus Boye

E-mail:

janus@irt.org

Web site:

http://www.janusboye.dk

Janus Boye is currently working as Managing Systems Engineer at Open Market GmbH in Frankfurt. Open Market recently acquired FutureTense to create a solution that combines Internet commerce and content in a unique solution based entirely on Java and XML. Open Market is a member of the W3C XML initiative, and both Open Market and FutureTense have used XML in their products since 1997.

Lately Janus has been heavily focused on the new XML-based standards, especially SMIL, SVG and MathML. Technical notes on what these great technologies have to offer has been written (see http://www.irt.org), the first implementations have been tried out, and now Janus is on the look for real-world solutions that uses them.

Prior joining Open Market, Janus worked with an American Internet consulting company called Proxicom.

Articles By Janus Boye:

182. Sunday 5th September 1999 - Hypertext on PDAs
Synopsis:
By Janus Boye. Wouldn't it be cool, if we could have a simple hypertext system on our PDA's? Imagine being able to enter a meeting in your calendar, and having that linked to the address of the meeting in your address book, plus linked to your meeting notes, and an email you received about the meeting.

Techniques:
PDA's, hand held devices, Hypertext
176. Wednesday 29th July 1999 - SVG Brings Fast Vector Graphics to Web
Synopsis:
This article, by Janus Boye, will first cover the exciting functionality that SVG brings to the Web, then discuss the advantages of being an XML-based graphics format, and then finally some words and predictions about the future of SVG.

Techniques:
SVG, Scalable Vector Graphics, images, XML, W3C working draft, PGML, DOM, XLink, XPointer
159. Friday 30th April 1999 - Time Changes Everything
Synopsis:
This article covers how time is slowly becoming a first-class citizen of the Web. Written by Janus Boye this article covers three exciting technologies that have come out in the last two years: SMIL (Synchronized Multimedia Integration Language), ASF (Advanced Streaming Format) and HTML+Time (Timed Interactive Multimedia Extensions).

Techniques:
SMIL, Synchronized Multimedia Integration Language, ASF, Advanced Streaming Format, HTML+Time, Timed Interactive Multimedia Extensions, time-based media content, multimedia, streaming content
147. Monday 8th February 1999 - Are all Portals the same?
Synopsis:
In this article, Janus Boye will briefly define what a portal actually is, give a short history of the portals, review some of the current portals, and finally give a short suggestion of where the portals might be heading.

Techniques:
Web Portals, Search Engines, History, Future, Market Share
140. Saturday 2nd January 1999 - How to update/edit data using Cold Fusion
Synopsis:
Janus Boye describes in a new article on Cold Fusion, Allaire's cross-platform Web application development system, how to update and edit data from a web page.

Techniques:
Databases, Cold Fusion, edit data, update data, SQL, CFIF, CFQUERY, CFOUTPUT, CFLOOP, CFELSE, CFUPDATE
135. Sunday 29th November 1998 - Why use CSS?
Synopsis:
Following on from the successful "Why bother with JavaScript?" article, Janus Boye initiates a "Why use CSS?" article. CSS - has its time come, or is it still an emerging technology?

Techniques:
CSS, Cascading Stlye Sheets, Aural Style Sheets, Browser support, HTML, content, style
125. Saturday 31st October 1998 - Where is the Web heading?
Synopsis:
Written by Janus Boye - the Web is moving in many different directions, this article attempts to cover only a few of these different directions.

Techniques:
Web communities, Browser Fragmentation, adavances in Technology, Usability
123. Sunday 25th October 1998 - Introduction to Cold Fusion
Synopsis:
Janus Boye introduces Cold Fusion - a dynamic way to update and maintain web pages based on entries within a database

Techniques:
Cold Fusion, CFML, database, dynamic pages, server side maintenance, CFQUERY, CFOUTPUT
120. Friday 9th October 1998 - WWW - How It All Begun
Synopsis:
WWW - How It All Begun - by Janus Boye

Techniques:
World Wide Web, history, hypertext
111. Friday 14th August 1998 - P3P - What's in it for us?
Synopsis:
In this article on P3P - the platform for privacy preferences project - Janus Boye tries to explain what P3P has to bring to the Web community.

Techniques:
p3p, platform for preferences preferences
096. Monday 15th June 1998 - XSL - What's in it for us?
Synopsis:
This article on XSL, written by Janus Boye, tries to explain what XSL has to bring to the Web community.

Techniques:
xsl, dsssl, xml, style, css
086. Saturday 16th May 1998 - RDF - What's in it for us?
Synopsis:
Written by Janus Boye. RDF - the Resource Description Framework - is a foundation for processing metadata; it provides interoperability between applications that exchange machine-understandable information on the Web. RDF emphasizes facilities to enable automated processing of Web ressources. RDF metadata can be used in a variety of application areas.

Techniques:
RDF, XML, Meta Data, authoring, publishing, cataloging, PICS, Site Maps, Dublin Core
081. Saturday 2nd May 1998 - MathML - What's in it for us?
Synopsis:
Janus Boye takes a look at MathML a new W3C Recommendation and explains why we might want to use it on our web pages.

Techniques:
Mathematics, MathML, XML, RDF, EzMath plugin
072. Saturday 28th March 1998 - XML - What's in it for us?
Synopsis:
Written by Janus Boye. If you're designing data-hungry sites, especially for intranets, you should be getting excited about XML, because in XML, you'll be able to create and respond to much richer set of data elements. That will in turn let you build more individualised dynamic sites and pages. For example, your site's users could access information across databases and types of data without having to rely on a search engine.

Techniques:
XML, HTML, XSL, CSS, SGML, CDF, OSD, ICE - Aghhhh! TLA overload!
069. Saturday 21st March 1998 - Math functions in JavaScript
Synopsis:
Written by Janus Boye. Math is power. So says one of the many ads on the Internet. JavaScript has the power, to do all functions that are on a normal pocket calculator, and even a few more.

Techniques:
Math, random(), round(), NaN, isNaN(), sin(), cos(), tan(), acos(), asin(), atan(), E, LN10, LN2, LOG10E, LOG2E, PI, SQRT1_2, SQRT2, abc(0), atan2(), ceil(), exp(), floor(), log(), max(), min(), pow(), sqrt()

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